Below you will find a number of submitted problems for use in the intermediate classroom.


Roller Coasters & Skate ParksRollerCoasterandSkateParks.png
Grade(s): 8
Strand(s): Measurement

Problem:
Students design a rollercoaster or skateboard park using circles. They use circumference and area formulas to find the length of the coaster and the area underneath it. At first it seems complicated but once they get started they get. I have to keep reminding them to keep it simple! I've attached the outline, the rubric and my examples. I will have the students examples up shortly. Submitted by Sudeep Sanyal, Karen Kain School of the Arts.


Submitted by: Sudeep Sanyal, Karen Kain School of the Arts

Efficient Cutting EfficientCutting.png
Grade(s): 8
Strand(s): Measurement

Problem:
A cylindrical container, like the tin cans used to package some food, can be made by using two circles for the ends and a rectangle which wraps round to form the body.
To make cylinders of varying sizes, the 3 pieces can be cut from a single rectangle of flat sheet in several ways. For example (see .pdf)
Challenge:
Use a single sheet of A4 paper and make a cylinder with the greatest possible volume. The cylinder must be closed off by a circle at each end.
What are its dimensions?
What to look for: The most efficient cut will have a diameter that is equal to the height.

PDF.jpg.pdf download link here

Source: Intermediate Math ABQ Package - Summer 2009 (Compiled by Trevor Brown)
Submitted by: Mark Ross, Norseman JMS

Squares & CirclesSquaresandCircles.png
Grade(s): 8
Strand(s): Measurement

Problem:
This is simply an extra worksheet that can be used for students to practice and apply the formulas for area and circumference of circles.
What to look for: Questions 12-15 can be quite tricky. Their solutions require students to divide the square into triangles and apply the formula for the area of a triangle. If they are not prompted beforehand they will often miss this point.

PDF.jpg.pdf download link here

Source: Intermediate Math ABQ Package – Summer 2009 (Compiled by Trevor Brown)
Submitted by: Mark Ross, Norseman JMS

High in Fiber HighinFiber.png
Grade(s): 7,8
Strand(s): Measurement, Geometry and Spatial Sense

Problem:
A cereal company has hired you to design a new ‘mini’ cereal box.

To create each box, they will be using sheets of cardboard measuring 8.5 x 11 inches.

Your job is to find the dimensions of the box that will fit the greatest amount of cereal. You need to first create a net, and then fold it into a box.

Before you begin to design your net, you must follow several important rules:
1) Your box will close with four flaps at the top and four flaps at the bottom (just like a regular box of cereal).
2) Your design must fold into a box. You cannot cut out 6 separate rectangles/squares and glue/tape them together.
3) You may use a maximum of 3 separate strips of tape to close the box completely.

PDF.jpg.pdf download link here
Submitted by: Mark Ross, Norseman JMS